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Should You Buy Your Office Printer Or Lease It?

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Whether you need a work group laser printer that doubles as a digital press, a wide-format inkjet or a plotter that can accommodate large CAD drawings, printing equipment can represent a big cash outlay for any business. Printer leasing service London instead of buying can help you improve your cash flow and still provide the devices you need to obtain and maintain a competitive advantage. As your hardware needs evolve, leasing can also make them easier to meet and manage

Keep Equipment Fresh

Because printer leasing company Maidstone run for fixed periods of time, after which you typically return the used gear to the leasing company, you can plan your lease terms to coincide with the replacement cycle you want to maintain for your output hardware. Depending on the number of employees who will use a device, the volume it prints and the likelihood that you will either outgrow or outlast it, you can plan ahead for new technology and avoid falling behind improvements in equipment design or features.

Preserve Working Capital

When you lease a printer instead of buying it outright, you avoid the potentially large initial outlay of an equipment purchase. If you finance your acquisition with a bank loan, you’ll be asked for a 10 to 20 percent down payment. A lease may stipulate payment of the first and last months’ installments before the lease term begins, but it represents a much more modest upfront investment. Preserving your business capital enables you to devote your money to other needs, such as staff growth or expansion plans. Choosing a long lease term may reduce payment amounts at the literal expense of increased total cost of ownership, however, as the sum of your payments can exceed the purchase price of the device.

Create a Fixed Cost

Leasing creates a fixed tax-deductible cost that avoids the need for complex depreciation schedules. Although deducting a purchase price as a lump sum may help you offset profits by a tidy sum, it produces a potentially uneven financial scenario, depending on how you schedule your depreciation. By comparison, lease payments become a monthly part of your bottom line. Note that leases that provide buyout clauses that enable you to purchase the equipment at a reduced cost at the end of the lease term may be subject to property tax, depending on how your local and state government structures its tax laws.

Bundled Equipment and Consumables

Leasing a printer can enable you to roll the cost of consumables and maintenance into the fixed cost of the monthly payment. Depending on the hardware you select, you may be able to secure a service agreement that includes ink or toner for a fixed number of printouts per month or quarter, and charges you for additional supplies beyond the output basis of the lease. This lease structure turns both your equipment and your supply payments into a fixed cost for which you can budget more readily than simply buying ink or toner cartridges when you run out.

Comparing Laser & InkJet Printers

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Comparing Laser & InkJet Printers

 

How to compare inkjet to laser printers? The short answer is that it comes down to how much you print, what type of documents you print and what your budget is. Epson multifunctional printers and oki multifunctional printers to buy are right up there with those to compare, so check out our comparison below.

Differences between inkjet and laser printers

Compared to laser printers inkjet devices are a more common form of office printing machine. They are usually relatively small and inexpensive to buy, and are refilled using colour and black and white ink cartridges. Essentially, the ink is sprayed onto the page through tiny nozzles in an array of small dots which make up the letters or image. The quality of printing is good for typed documents and small colour pictures, but the print quality may not be good enough for professional looking documents or large images.

In comparison laser printers offer a higher quality of printing, able to produce incredibly sharp images and high resolutions. Laser printing devices use large cartridges filled with toner powder, which is fused to the page by heat and a static charge.  They work faster, with little noise and are capable of excellent print quality even on larger formats. However, the main downside with laser printers is that they are expensive and cartridges can be costly compare to inkjet devices. So they are currently less popular.

Who needs a laser printer?

A laser printer is especially good for producing high quality black and white printing at high speeds. Compared to an inkjet, a laser printer doesn’t always guarantee a good colour printing quality, unless you are purchasing a high-end model for very specific work. Whilst the initial outlay is expensive, servicing and toner costs tend to be lower in the long run, so laser printers are more economical than you might first think.

  • Unbeatable print speed, so more pages can be printed every minute. Over time, this is more economical for companies with a large print volume.
  • Waterproof printing.
  • Cheaper laser printers can be purchased at around the same price point as an inkjet, although only for a mono-printer.
  • Cartridges do not require frequent changing.
  • Constantly lowering price point.
  • Can be used with a whole range of paper thicknesses and finishes.
  • Most suited to larger office environments with a need for large volumes of good quality printing.

Advantages of inkjet

It would be wrong, however, to write off the inkjet printer, as it still satisfies a lot of business printing needs at a very reasonable cost. In particular, a good quality inkjet still produces excellent quality colour images and is a very versatile device. The downsides are the frequent need to change ink cartridges (which can be costly), slow print speeds and lower resolution black and white printing.

  • Cheap to purchase compared to laser printers.
  • Versatile business printing solution.
  • Good quality colour printing on images, especially useful for photographs.
  • Affordable repairs.
  • This printer is perfect for small businesses where space is at a premium.
  • Suitable for most home and office needs where print volume isn’t too high.

Multifunction Printers VS Stand Alone Printers

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So you’re looking for a new office printer? But you don’t know what to choose or where to start? Well help is at hand. Whilst the choice might seem overwhelming (do you need inkjet? Wireless? Colour or black and white printers?  A stand-alone or multifunction printer? This can quickly be narrowed down depending on your needs. Finding the differences between a stand alone printer or a Kyocera multifunctional printers online, Konica-Minolta buying multifunctional printers and buying a Samsung multifunctional printers is hard! The most important choice you have is between stand-alone or multifunction business printers. Once you have decided on this you can look further into inkjet verses laser printing, whether you would prefer a wireless printer and what features are essential, such as duplex printing or paper size compatibility.

Stand-alone copiers and printers

Stand-alone printers and photocopiers provide the perfect solution for businesses with a large volume of printing work and need the highest quality finish in the quickest possible time. The core benefits of these printing devices include:

  • High volume capacity.
  • Durability and reliability.
  • Function rich. Machines can be set to staple, sort, align, hole-punch and change paper size without needing to be constantly monitored.
  • Very fast printing and photocopying speeds.
  • Low printing cost per page.
  • Excellent resolution print quality.

With new technology constantly being introduced to the business printing market, stand-alone devices really can give you a professional print finish whilst saving your staff considerable amounts of time.

Multifunction printers

A multifunction device incorporates a printer, photocopier, fax machine and scanner in one compact machine. Multifunction printers are particularly well suited to businesses that have limited office space, don’t have a permanent home or have continuously changing print and copy needs. The main advantages of multifunction printers are:

  • Space saving and energy efficient.
  • Cheaper than buying separate scanners, faxes, printers and photocopiers.
  • Comprehensive document management in one easy to use multifunction machine.
  • Lots of choice in the marketplace, meaning you can find a multifunction printer perfectly suited to your specific needs.
  • Easy to maintain and if it should breakdown, you only need to repair one piece of equipment.
  • Only one set of consumables to order.
  • Some multifunction devices come with sophisticated digital photography and image management programmes.
  • A wireless multifunction printer can be connected to a number of PCs and laptops (as well as mobile phones and tablets) around the office without the need for wires.

Should You Lease Or Buy A Printer?

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The next time your business needs new computers, networking equipment or other technology, should you buy it or go for renting a printer London? If you don’t know, read on. This month we’ll take a look at the benefits–and downsides–of both leasing and buying technology equipment, plus the questions you should ask to ensure you get the best deal.

Leasing: The Benefits

  • Leasing keeps your equipment up-to-date.Computers and other tech equipment eventually become obsolete. With a lease, you pass the financial burden of obsolescence to the equipment leasing company. For example, let’s say you have a two-year lease on a copy machine. After that lease expires, you’re free to lease whatever equipment is newer, faster and cheaper. (This is also a reason some people prefer to lease their cars.) In fact, 65 percent of respondents to a 2005 Equipment Leasing Association survey said the ability to have the latest equipment was leasing’s number-one perceived benefit.
  • You’ll have predictable monthly expenses.With a lease, you have a pre-determined monthly line item, which can help you budget more effectively. Thirty-five percent of respondents to the Equipment Leasing Association’s survey said this was leasing’s second-highest benefit.
  • You pay nothing up front.Many small businesses struggle with cash flow and must keep their coffers as full as possible. Because leases rarely require a down payment, you can acquire new equipment without tapping much-needed funds.
  • You’re able to more easily keep up with your competitors.Leasing can enable your small business to acquire sophisticated technology, such as a voice over internet protocol (VoIP) phone system, that might be otherwise unaffordable. The result: You’re better able to keep up with your larger competitors without draining your financial resources.

Leasing: The Downsides

  • You’ll pay more in the long run.Ultimately, leasing is almost always more expensive than purchasing. For example, a $4,000 computer would cost a total of $5,760 if leased for three years at $160 per month but only $4,000 (plus sales tax) if purchased outright.
  • You’re obligated to keep paying even if you stop using the equipment.Depending on the lease terms, you may have to make payments for the entire lease period, even if you no longer need the equipment, which can happen if your business changes.

Buying: The Benefits

  • It’s easier than leasing.Buying equipment is easy–you decide what you need, then go out and buy it. Taking out a lease, however, involves at least some paperwork, as leasing companies often ask for detailed, updated financial information. They may also ask how and where the leased equipment will be used. Also, lease terms can be complicated to negotiate. And if you don’t negotiate properly, you could end up paying more than you should or receiving unfavorable terms.
  • You call the shots regarding maintenance.Equipment leases often require you to maintain equipment according to the leasing company’s specifications, and that can get expensive. When you buy the equipment outright, you determine the maintenance schedule yourself.
  • Your equipment is deductible.Section 179 of the IRS code lets you deduct the full cost of newly purchased assets, such as computer equipment, in the first year. With most leases favored by small businesses–called operating leases–you can only deduct the monthly payment.

How To Perform A Used Car Inspection

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Do you want to perform a used car inspection? Following these 5 steps will help you ensure you don’t buy a car with a laundry list of hidden problems. If you’re thinking about buying a used car, an important step in process is thoroughly inspecting the vehicle before you buy it. This can save you a lot of headaches (and money) down the road. Companies like damageid.com can help! Following these five steps can help you learn what to look for when performing a used car inspection.

  • Check the condition of the body

The first thing to do in a used car inspection is to examine each body panel, as well as the roof. Make note of any rust spots, dents, and scratches. Look closely at the gaps between the panels (e.g. between the fenders and the doors). If the gaps are uneven, this usually means they were assembled poorly in the factory, or the vehicle was poorly repaired. Also, ensure the colour and finish of the paint are the same on each panel. Next, using a flashlight, take a look inside of the wheel wells for rust. Lastly, open and close all of the doors, as well as the hood and trunk. Inspect all rubber seals around the doors and windows for rot or tearing.

  • Take a look at the glass

Walk around the vehicle and take a careful look at all the glass to make sure there are no cracks or large, cratered areas. Small chips are nothing to be too worried about, but you may want to use them as a bargaining chip when discussing the final price. Cracks, on the other hand, will only get worse and can require an expensive repair later.

  • On even ground, check out the suspension

Another essential thing to check in a used car inspection is the suspension. Stand back from the car and see if it’s slumping or sagging anywhere; what you want it to see that it’s standing level. Push down on each corner of the car. If the shock absorbers are in good condition, the car should rebound only once. If the car continues moving up and down, there’s something wrong. Tug on the top of the front tires. Feel for any movement and listen for and clicking sounds. If you feel or hear anything, it could mean a suspension joint or wheel bearing is broken.

  • Never buy a car with frame damage

One of the most important points to check for in a used car inspection is frame damage. Open the hood and check the saddle (this is the part connecting the front fenders and holding the top of the radiator). This should be bolted into place on either side and never welded. The bolt heads inside the hood, at the top of the fenders, should not have any scratch marks, which can indicate replacement or realignment after a crash. Lastly, check for welds inside of the door jambs.

  • Are the lights and lenses in good condition?

Ideally, bring a friend for the used car inspection so that he/she can confirm that all of the lights are working. Be sure to check all lights on the vehicle: lo-beams, high-beams, turn signals, fog lights, brake lights, 3rd brake light, and reverse light. Additionally, ensure that all lenses and reflectors are not damaged, fogged with moisture, or missing altogether.

  • Tires tell a story of their own

Surprisingly, a lot of information about a car can be gleaned from the tires alone. Anytime you perform a used car inspection, be sure to look closely at tire wear. Often times, a car with less than 20,000 miles on the odometer will still have the original tires installed. If the car has brand new tires and very low-mileage on the clock, this is a good indicator of odometer rollback. Also, all four tires should be the same, as having different tires installed could be a sign that they were replaced.

The wear on the tread should be even across the width of the tire, on both sides of the car.

Why You Need Product Development

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Product development is simple in concept. It is the:

  • Conversion of market need to a reality-based solution
  • Creating the tangible from the intangible
  • Creation of new wealth

The success of product development efforts typically require considerable resources and the opportunity for lackluster results or outright failure are far higher than anyone will admit. Because of this high risk of failure, it is important to know why product development is important to companies and society.

Why Product Development is Important

product engineering services, is the life-blood of companies and societies. The product could be a physical product such as an automobile, smartphone, or coffee maker. It could also be services such as new IT solution, new manufacturing process, or a new real estate marketing concept.

All successful product development actions provide the following:

  1. New value for customers
  2. Improved society
  3. Continued existence of the company

New Value for Customers

The first and most important reason for any new development is to provide new value to the customer. Without this, there is no reason for them to trade their money for the new device. However, if the product or service offers overwhelming value, then customers will flock to it.

This new and increasing value is what keeps companies growing. If there is no new value to offer customers, the firm wilts and eventually dies. If the value offered is not increasing, then the company is losing ground in the market as its competitors increase their value in the market.

Improved Society

Many new products are simply an incremental improvement over the previous version with only some new features or slight faster performance. These products may sustain the company by offering enough new value to generate additional revenue, but they are hardly a boon to society.

There are certain instances where new products will improve society beyond just the immediate gratification of the consumer. Example of these are innovative new drugs to treat debilitating diseases and automotive safety devices that save hundreds of lives per year. Neither of these may offer the consumer swift satisfaction, but they save lives and therefore improve society.

Continued Existence and Growth of the Company

New products and services are the lifeblood of any company. Without them, the firm withers on the vine and either dies or is absorbed by another firm. Society is well-served by the continuance of these companies from the employment of the individuals who work there (who are also consumers), and the support for society at-large in the form of taxation and charitable giving.

Companies (and civilizations) have little choice but grow and improve if they want to move from survival to thriving. The new products and services created and provided by companies of all sizes provide the mechanism for this growth and improvement. What are you and your firm doing to improve?

What You Need To Know About Insurance Write-Offs

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There are many different types of car insurance write-off – including some vehicles that can be repaired and put back on the road and some that must be destroyed and never used again.

A Category D insurance write-off falls into the former class: it can legally return to the road, so long as it complies with specific rules governing the various stages of its return to use on the public highway. Firstly though, what causes a Cat D write-off? Quite often, nothing more than light damage. It generally means the vehicle has been lightly damaged but the financial cost of repairing the car outweighs its market value. In short, it is not economical to repair – remember, car insurance companies look at the total cost of repair here, including hire cars, expensive-to-source parts for particular models and so on. Cat D status can sometimes be for very minor damage, if the rest of the repair process is deemed to be more than the car is worth.

This does not mean it can’t be put back on the road, however. Here’s what’s involved in using a Category D insurance write-off on the road. Using a Vehicle Damage App can take a lot of the pressure out of your hands, and thus give you peace of mind after an accident. Once a vehicle is written off and the insurance claim has been paid to the owner, the car insurance company then legally owns the vehicle. Following this, insurers often sell these cars on to garages and motor factors that have the means to repair any damage at a reduced cost. This makes it financially viable for these businesses to repair the car to a roadworthy condition and sell it on, with the insurance company also recouping some of its costs.

If your car has been written off as a Category D case, the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) and the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) will not be informed of the situation, and the car will not be subject to a Vehicle Information Check. The damage is deemed light enough that the car can be repaired and put back on the road following the work. Of course, the car can also be sold through a licensed salvage yard as a damaged car, or broken for spare parts. If the Cat D car is repaired, we do highly recommend that you get a professional mechanic or vehicle engineer to assess the quality of the work and ensure it has been carried out to a high standard. This way, the repaired car will be as safe as possible. It’s important to remember a Cat D car will have been written off only because it is uneconomical to fix, not because any potential damage was so great it could not be driven again. As a result, no test is needed to validate the work, as a reputable garage should deliver the car to a roadworthy standard – if not, subsequent MOT tests should pick up any defects or faulty repairs anyway.

It’s also worth bearing in mind that while a Category D car for sale might be much cheaper than the market value – even if it is in perfect shape with the repairs being carried out to a high standard – when it comes to reselling the vehicle, it won’t be worth as much. Traders have to declare if a car has been written off as part of a sale, but private individuals do not. To help make sure you don’t get caught out paying over the odds, a car data check will unearth if a car has been written off and into what category it was placed – and can be done for just a few pounds. While a cat D write-off might seem cheap, don’t forget some insurers might refuse to offer you cover on a written off vehicle, too, no matter how light the damage was. If you are thinking about buying a cat D vehicle, be sure to check with your car insurance company whether they cover Category D cars.

What You Need To Know Before Buying A Copier

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Although ubiquitous in companies around the world, photocopiers are not one and the same. They may fulfill more or less the same task, yet it is important to assess your needs and get proper information to find a model which will match your expectations and at the same time be simple enough to operate. Besides, when you intend to buy a photocopier from blackbox-solutions.co.uk, it’s also crucial to consider other options such as renting or leasing, to make sure you get the best service at the right price. Most modern photocopiers are nowadays preferably referred to as multi-function printers (MFPs), as they’re able to carry out a wide range of tasks. There are so many different levels of sophistication that taking certain key notions into account is vital to improve your business efficiency when you buy a photocopier.

Ink-jet or laser?

Choosing laser or ink-jet technology depends on your volume requirements. When the price per page is an important consideration, laser machines are at the high end of the price range but are still the optimal option as they are well-adapted to large volumes of copies. When low volume colour documents are required, ink-jet MFPs are the best choice, even if the ink they use is more expensive than toner for laser printers.

Print quality and speed

Speed is generally the most important feature for many businesses. Typically, mid-range machines will provide speeds of between 25 and 50 pages per minute for A4 paper. For companies which need mostly black and white copies, some models are faster in that mode than in colour. Print quality, or resolution, is also an important issue. Most machines offer resolution in the 600-1200 dpi range, which is perfect for internal use or simple flyers and user manuals. For high quality brochures and marketing material, you may need to buy a photocopier able to reach 2400

dpi.

Ergonomics

Manufacturers have taken steps to make their products as user-friendly as possible, and even offer on-site training sessions and hotlines. Network capabilities are essential in most modern offices, to integrate your MFP in the company’s infrastructure. Paper capacity must be carefully considered when you buy a photocopier. Needing to refill the paper tray too often may have an adverse effect on your workflow. High-capacity or multiple paper trays for different paper weights or types will ensure your printer is always ready. Likewise, a variety of finishing tools such as staplers or document folders.

Price

Assessing your needs to pinpoint your budget is of paramount importance, as prices range from £100 to more than £17,000. However, there’s more than just the capital cost to consider, as on the long run the price per page, depending on your printing volume, will represent most of your expenses.

According to your needs and the volume of documents you need to process, permanent purchase may not be the best option. Second hand machines or buying online may also be interesting ways to save money.

Buying a photocopier online

When you want to buy a photocopier, going online is always a good idea, to compare prices, understand the various models’ specificities and benefit from cheaper prices thanks to cheaper overheads. You’ll easily find retailers specializing in monochrome, multifunction or colour photocopiers for instance. You will also be able to negotiate good service rates.

Renting and leasing

Lease purchase or rental will allow you to spread the cost of your photocopier from blackbox-solutions.co.uk over several monthly fees, while guaranteeing your peace of mind as servicing and maintenance are often included in rental or lease contracts. That way, you’ll pay the best price for all your copying needs.

What Kind Of Office Printer Should You Go For?

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Most of us use wireless printers from blackbox-solutions.co.uk at home. Why worry about connecting your computer when you can print from anywhere? However, wired connections are typically faster, more reliable and far more secure, all of which are important in business environments, where printers are used more often and by more people at once. Wireless setups, on the other hand, are more flexible, along with being less expensive to deploy.

They are also compatible with mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. In our increasingly mobile world, many businesses —particularly large enterprises —are choosing to install

applications that allow mobile printing either by connecting the device to the printer or using a Wi-Fi or Bluetooth connection. This is often referred to as cloud printing or mobile printing. Not all printers are compatible with this emerging technology, but it’s something to consider if you have a highly mobile-reliant workforce. Some office printers are also compatible with mobile-printing technologies such as Apple AirPrint, HP ePrint and Google Cloud Print, but that’s something you’ll need to verify.

If you’re solely printing simple business documents in plain text —spreadsheets, memos and letters —monochrome is probably fine. If you need to print graphics, custom logos or documents with charts and other visuals, you’ll want to go with a color printer. Monochrome printers still sell surprisingly well because they cut ongoing costs, but keep in mind that you’re likely stuck with the printer you choose for many years. If you need the ability to print color in the future, you’ll have to find another source.

One of the first things to consider when it comes to features is whether you need a single-function or multi-function printer (MFP). Just as it sounds, single-function printers do one thing: print documents. MFPs are capable of many other tasks, including scanning, copying, emailing and converting documents. Different models combine different features. MFPs are cost-effective because you avoid having to purchase multiple machines, and they take up less space. They help streamline document management and business workflow because you can fax, scan and email documents all from the same machine. However, they’re more expensive. And if one person is using the machine to print, for example, another employee will have to wait to send a fax, make a copy, etc.

Next, consider printing speed and volume, which have a significant impact on price. Generally, print speeds of less than 20 pages per minute (ppm) are too slow for office environments; speeds of 20 ppm to 40 ppm will suffice for most offices; and speeds above 40 ppm are ideal for high-volume use. Some of the most sophisticated machines reach 100 ppm, although this is far more than most small businesses need. Print volume can range from basic models that hold just 100 sheets in the tray and 250 in the cassette to MFPs that hold 500 sheets in the tray and 2,000 or more in two or more cassettes.

Advantages of Multifunctional Printers

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Most printer manufacturers offer multifunctional models from blackbox-solutions.co.uk that provide the capabilities of multiple machines in a single unit. These devices often include print, scan, copy and fax capabilities in the form of one all-inclusive machine. Originally marketed for home and small business users, many manufacturers now offer larger and more robust models for medium to large business use. Understanding the advantages and disadvantages of a multifunction printer helps you make an informed decision when purchasing new equipment.

Convenience

A multifunction printer like the ones from blackbox-solutions.co.uk offers the convenience of additional features you may not have purchased otherwise. For example, if you normally do not send or receive many fax messages, you may not have invested in a separate fax machine. However, a multifunctional printer that includes fax capabilities allows you to send or receive the occasional fax without an added expense. In addition, the ability to scan an image and then print that image using the same machine offers another level of convenience by saving you the time of walking to two separate devices.

Space Savings

Perhaps one of the greatest advantages of a multifunctional printer includes the space savings offered by the device. Rather than having to find space for a printer, a copier, a fax machine and a

scanner, you can have the same functionality in a single machine. This space savings may benefit those trying to make the most of their home office space or those working with significant space constraints.

Cost Savings

Another advantage of a multifunctional printer includes the cost savings of purchasing one device that performs multiple functions. Although the purchase price for an all-in-one printer may exceed that of a traditional printer, the overall cost typically remains less than purchasing multiple machines. Therefore, you can benefit from increased functionality without paying for each feature. In addition to the savings associated with the original purchase price, maintaining one device costs less than maintaining multiple devices.

Power Savings

Multifunction printers typically require one cord to power the entire device. Not only does this reduce cable congestion, it lowers the electricity required to run the device. This power savings also leads to increased cost savings.

Disadvantages

The biggest disadvantage of a multifunctional device becomes apparent when a problem occurs. Due to the multifunctional nature of the device, a problem with the printer may cause all features to fail. For example, a problem with an ink or toner cartridge may prevent you from printing, copying and receiving faxes. Another disadvantage of a multifunctional printer includes the potential lack of quality or performance when compared to single function devices. For example, the fax machine on a multifunctional device may not offer the same features as those offered by a standalone fax machine.